Thoughts and Feelings: Taking Control of Your Moods and Your Life

Thoughts and Feelings: Taking Control of Your Moods and Your Life

Matthew McKay PhD

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 1608822087

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Thoughts and Feelings: Taking Control of Your Moods and Your Life

Matthew McKay PhD

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 1608822087

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


If you are depressed, anxious, angry, worried, confused, frustrated, upset, or ashamed, please remember that you are not alone in your struggle with painful feelings and experiences. Everybody experiences emotional distress sometimes. It’s normal. But when the pain becomes too strong and too enduring, it’s time to take that important first step toward feeling better.

Painful thoughts can arise in many ways. You may struggle with anxiety and depression, or feel that procrastination or perfectionism is holding you back. Regardless of the issue, you’ve come to this book with a desire to change your thoughts and feelings for the better. This classic self-help workbook offers powerful cognitive therapy tools for making that happen.

Now in its fourth edition, Thoughts and Feelings provides you with twenty evidence-based techniques that can be combined to create a personal treatment plan for overcoming a range of mental health concerns, including worry, panic attacks, depression, low self-esteem, anger, and emotional and behavioral challenges of any kind. Customize your plan to address multiple concerns at once, or troubleshoot the thoughts and feelings that bother you most. Used and recommended by the most renowned and respected therapists, this comprehensive mental health workbook offers all of best psychological tools for quickly regaining mastery over your moods and emotions. This endlessly useful guide has helped thousands of readers:

  • Challenge self-sabotaging patterns of thinking
  • Practice relaxation techniques to maintain self-control in stressful situations
  • Change the core beliefs that drive painful emotions
  • Identify and prioritize their values for a more focused, fulfilling life

Using proven effective methods based in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT, and mindfulness, this book will help you take that first step toward feeling better—about yourself, and about the world around you. Isn't it time you started really enjoying life?

The Compass of Pleasure: How Our Brains Make Fatty Foods, Orgasm, Exercise, Marijuana, Generosity, Vodka, Learning, and Gambling Feel So Good

Perfect Chaos: A Daughter's Journey to Survive Bipolar, a Mother's Struggle to Save Her

Shades of Blue: Writers on Depression, Suicide, and Feeling Blue

Bipolar Type 2: Creating The RIGHT Bipolar Diet & Nutritional Plan

Take Charge of Bipolar Disorder: A 4-Step Plan for You and Your Loved Ones to Manage the Illness and Create Lasting Stability

Taming Bipolar Disorder (Psychology Today Here to Help)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

up. Driving home. depression 80 This is my whole life. There’s no way out of this. Watching TV with kids. depression 90 They never talk to me. They hardly know me. They don’t care. Wife goes to bed early. depression 85 She’s really mad. She’s disgusted with me. Have to work through lunch. 24 Uncovering Automatic Thoughts SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS Sometimes automatic thoughts come so quickly and in such abbreviated form that you can’t identify them, even though you know you just had

overgeneralization is applying global labels to people, places, and things you don’t like. Somebody who refused to give you a ride home is labeled a “total jerk.” A quiet guy on a date is a “dull clam.” Democrats are “knee-­jerk liberals.” New York City is “hell on earth.” Television is an “evil, corrupting influence.” You’re “stupid” and “totally wasting your life.” Each of these labels may contain a grain of truth, but it generalizes that grain into a global judgment that ignores all contrary

experience. Psychologist Albert Ellis was the first to develop a method to evaluate evidence for and against key beliefs, as a component of rational emotive therapy (Ellis and Harper 1961). But because his approach assumes that hot thoughts are always irrational and focuses mostly on the evidence against them, it may not always feel objective. It also may alienate people who have solid evidence to support certain hot thoughts. Psychologist Christine Padesky (Greenberger and Padesky 1995),

your toes up toward your face while tightening your calf and shin muscles, then relax. Next, curl your toes while tightening your calf, thigh, and buttock muscles, then relax. Relaxation without Tension Within seven to fourteen PMR practice sessions, you should be adept at recognizing and releasing tension in your muscles. After that, you may not need to deliberately contract each muscle group before you relax it. Instead, scan your body for tension by running your attention through the four

be in order to eliminate some of the new activities that offer little nourishment. At this stage, you can also cut down on the number of new activities you add each week. However, you should still continue to make plans on your Weekly Activity Schedule. Writing activities down increases the chance that you’ll do them. Keep filling in planned mastery and pleasure activities in your weekly schedule until you feel a significant improvement in your level of depression. 151 CHAPTER 12 Putting

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