Three Negro Classics: Up From Slavery; The Souls of Black Folk; The Autobiography of an Ex-colored Man

Three Negro Classics: Up From Slavery; The Souls of Black Folk; The Autobiography of an Ex-colored Man

W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Booker T. Washington

Language: English

Pages: 516

ISBN: B003E782PG

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Three Negro Classics: Up From Slavery; The Souls of Black Folk; The Autobiography of an Ex-colored Man

W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Booker T. Washington

Language: English

Pages: 516

ISBN: B003E782PG

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


UP FROM SLAVERY

The autobiography of Booker T. Washington is a startling portrait of one of the great Americans of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The illegitimate son of 'a white man and a Negro slave, Washington, a man who struggled for his education, would go on to struggle for the dignity of all his people in a hostile and alien society.

THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK

W.E.B. DuBois's classic is a major sociological document and one of the momentous books in the mosaic of American literature. No other work has had greater influence on black thinking, and nowhere is the African-American's unique heritage and his kinship with all men so passionately described.

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN EX-COLORED MAN

Originally published anonymously, James Weldon Johnson's penetrating work is a remarkable human account of the life of black Americans in the early twentieth century and a profound interpretation of his feelings towards the white man and towards members of his own race. No other book touches with such understanding and objectivity on the phenomenon once called "passing" in a white society.

These three narratives, gathered together in Three Negro Classics chronicle the remarkable evolution of African-American consciousness on both a personal and social level. Profound, intelligent, and insightful, they are as relevant today as they have ever been.

The Autobiography of Booker T. Washington is a startling portrait of one of the great Americans of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The illegitimate son of a white man and a Negro slave, Washington, a man who struggled for his education, would go on to struggle for the dignity of all his people in a hostile and alien society.W.E.B. DuBois's classic is a major sociological document and one of the momentous books in the mosaic of American literature. No other work has had greater influence on black thinking, and nowhere is the African-American's unique heritage and his kinship with all men so passionately described.Originally published anonymously, James Weldon Johnson's penetrating work is a remarkable human account of the life of black Americans in the early twentieth century and a profound interpretation of his feelings towards the white man and towards members of his own race. No other book touches with such understanding and objectivity on the phenomenon once called "passing" in a white society.These three narratives, gathered together in Three Negro Classics, chronicle the remarkable evolution of African-American consciousness on both a personal and social level. Profound, intelligent, and insightful, they are as relevant today as they have ever been.

* Raw scan PDF with OCRed text by the Internet Archive.

Life and Death in Shanghai

George Best: A Celebration: Untold True Stories of Our Most Legendary Footballer

Madame Curie: A Biography

The Naked Civil Servant

A Mountain of Crumbs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

with the idea that I could succeed, and I never had much patience with the multitudes of people who are always ready to explain why one cannot succeed. I have always had a high regard for the man who could tell me how to succeed. I determined to face the situation just as it was. At the end of the week I went to the treasurer of the Hampton Institute, General J. F. B. Marshall, and condition. To my gratification he could reenter the institution, and that he would trust me to pay the debt when I

condition. It seems to me that this was the most dismal period of my life. My good friend Mrs. Ruffner, to made me welcome referred, always whom at her have already home, and as- I Up From 67 Slavery me in many ways during this trying period. Before end of the vacation she gave me some work, and this, sisted the work in a coal-mine at some distance from home, enabled me to earn a little money. At one time it looked as if I would have to give up the idea of returning to Hampton, but

with yours in a wa^Jhat shall . j^ make the interests of both races one. T n all things that are pur ely social we can be as separate "as the fing ers, yet one as The ha nd in STTlgjn gs e^enlial tcTmutual p rogress. There is.no defence or~security for any of us except in the highest intelligence and development of all. If anywhere there are efforts tending to curtail the fullest growth of the Negro, let these efforts be turned into stimulating, encouraging, and making him the most useful and

"missionary" might have said or done with regard to others, he was careful not to take his son away from the institution. Many of the coloured papers, especially those that were the organs of religious bodies, joined in the general chorus \)f condemnation or demands for retraction. During the whole time of the excitement, and through all the criticism, I knew did not utter a was word of explanation or and that time and the sober second thought of the people would vindicate me. It was

church, and found it packed with people. The surprise gave me a shock that I did not recover from during the whole evening. People often ask me if I feel nervous before speaking, or else they suggest that, since I speak so often, they suppose that I get used to it. In answer to this question I have to say that I always suffer intensely from nervousness before speaking. More than once, just before I was to make an important address, this nervous strain has been so great that I have resolved never

Download sample

Download