Timeless Adventures: How Doctor Who Conquered TV

Timeless Adventures: How Doctor Who Conquered TV

Brian J. Robb

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 184344156X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Timeless Adventures: How Doctor Who Conquered TV

Brian J. Robb

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 184344156X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


An expanded edition of the critical history of Doctor Who covering the series' 45 years, from creation to triumphant reboot

Opening with an in-depth account of the creation of the series in the early 1960s, each decade of the show is tackled through a unique political and pop cultural historical viewpoint, exploring the links between contemporary Britain and the stories Doctor Who told, and how such links kept the show popular with a mass television audience. This book reveals how Doctor Who is at its strongest when it reflects the political and cultural concerns of a mass audience (the 1960s, 1970s, and 21st Century), and at its weakest when catering to a narrow fan-based audience (as in the 1980s). Chapters range from discussions on the cultural and political relevance of Doctor Who monsters like the Daleks (based on lingering wartime fears) and the Cybermen (1960s spare part replacement surgery), through to themes like energy and the environment in the 1970s (Doctor Who stories tackled big real-life themes in a fantasy format and so connected with a mass audience). The book also addresses the cancellation of the show in the late 1980s (following the series becoming increasing self-obsessed) and the ways in which a narrowly-focused dedicated fandom contributed to the show's demise and yet was also instrumental in its regeneration for the 21st century under Russell T. Davies, and analyzes the new series to reveal what has made it so popular, reflecting real world issues like consumerism and dieting.

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Bullshit and Philosophy: Guaranteed to Get Perfect Results Every Time (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

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It Came From the 1950s!: Popular Culture, Popular Anxieties

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ethics (or even the possibility) of altering history, The Aztecs was one of the few Doctor Who stories that gave the Doctor something approaching a romantic relationship (very much the norm for the twenty-first century series, but unusual previously). A delightful subplot has a bemused Doctor (Hartnell at his whimsical best) accidentally becoming engaged to an Aztec woman, Cameca (Margot van der Burgh), when sharing a cup of hot chocolate. The straightforward historical tales continued to

introduction of an adversary for the Doctor who would prove to be the most important addition to the series’ mythology since the creation of the Time Lords. Feeling the Doctor was akin to Sherlock Holmes, Letts decided he needed a Moriarty, resulting in the creation of the Master (Roger Delgado). A renegade Time Lord, he was the Doctor’s evil mirror image. The presence of the Master in each of the eighth season’s five stories gave some justification for the repeated invasions of Earth as he

better ship as it could contain a group of people, unlike (she assumed) a time machine that, in the style of HG Wells’ time traveller in his novel The Time Machine, would only allow an individual to travel. Wilson wanted the new show to steer clear of anything computer-related, as this had featured quite heavily in the BBC’s recent Andromeda serials. The telepathy idea from the original report was reconsidered, but not thought to be central to any possible series. Braybon suggested basing a

time I was doing the series, and that was not accidental,’ said Williams. ‘I wanted the humour to be there, to add a little bonus without detracting from the story. If people did not get the joke, it should not impair their enjoyment of the show.’ Two other stories would mine this seam of Greek myth recast as space opera (The Armageddon Factor and The Horns of Nimon). Having built the set of the spaceship featured in Underworld, it became clear that the remaining sets would be unaffordable, as

companions could pass to enter. In his notes in response to this, Newman criticised Webber’s concept as ‘not visual’, feeling that a ‘tangible symbol’ was needed for the ship. Webber had provided the answer in his document, but it took others to spot it. In his struggles to describe the ship while avoiding science-fictional clichés he suggested ‘something humdrum… such as a night-watchman’s shelter’ through which the Doctor and the gang could pass to ‘arrive inside a marvellous contrivance of

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