Training Your Brain For Dummies

Training Your Brain For Dummies

Tracy Packiam Alloway

Language: English

Pages: 284

ISBN: 0470974494

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Training Your Brain For Dummies

Tracy Packiam Alloway

Language: English

Pages: 284

ISBN: 0470974494

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Put your brain through its paces and achieve first-rate mental agility

The brain is your body's most important muscle and, with regular exercise, you can improve its performance and strengthen it against age-related deterioration. This guide offers everything you need to know to keep your brain and memory in tip-top shape, whether it's by choosing the right foods or playing the piano. From puzzles and exercises to the best day-to-day habits and long-term mental fitness techniques, this book enables you to boost your mental agility and reduce memory loss. So shake off those cobwebs and get your brain fighting-fit in no time!

  • Start as you mean to go on – get to grips with the basics of brain training and discover how to make it work for you
  • Keep your mind razor sharp – improve your memory and banish that pesky 'tip-of-the- tongue' phenomenon
  • Have happy thoughts – follow expert advice on how to keep your mind happy and healthy
  • Start afresh – adapt to new brain-friendly diet and lifestyle choices
  • Let the games begin – get stuck into a compendium of brain games, exercises and puzzles
  • Open the book and find:

    - The facts behind the fiction
    - Mental fitness exercises for children and the over-50s
    - Ways to memorise your shopping list, put names to faces, and remember directions
    - How to visualise your success
    - Why socialising is important
    - Techniques for managing stress and anxiety
    - Advice on nutrition and 'brain food'
    - Word searches, sudoku puzzles, and more

    Manic: A Memoir

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    the Mozart effect. This is important to note, because when no one else is able to reproduce a scientific finding, the original findings are likely to have been a fluke. The premise that listening to Mozart will make your child smarter is simply false. Your baby has almost all the nerve cells (neurons) at birth, and these nerve cells make important new connections after birth. These connections help the baby not only in the basic sensory skills such as sight, hearing, feeling and taste, but also

    something familiar – is a trick some memory experts use. Here’s an example: imagine you’ve just woken up and you see a poster of John Travolta on your cupboard. You remember that your friend gave it to you because you liked the movie Grease. You go into the bathroom and notice your unfinished school project – a model of the Eiffel Tower – is lying unfinished in the middle of the floor. You drowsily make your way to the living room and see that your brother has spilled pasta sauce all over the

    Figure 5-2, you probably blinked several times, looked away to check something else out, and maybe even let your mind drift to another thought. But you did quite well at remembering the locations on the grid in Figure 5-2 because your eyes take a ‘snapshot’ of what they see, and your brain stores that image. Your brain doesn’t save the image for long though, or transfer it to long-term memory, which 58 Part II: Remember, Remember . . . Keeping Your Memory Sharp explains why you find it easier

    Sociable 125 people who were more isolated. This finding means that social integration – your friendships – preserve your memory. Follow these suggestions of different things that you can do with a friend: ✓ Have a laugh. A simple thing like laughing releases hormones that combat stress and boost the brain. If you don’t have a funny friend, even watching a humorous video has the same effects. Even better, watch a video clip of your friends, maybe something you made together on holiday or at a

    Alzheimer’s disease. You can do many things to keep these memories fresh; I discuss how in Chapter 4. ✓ Semantic memory. Your knowledge of facts and random bits of information is known as semantic memory, which is very useful in converting new information from your short-term memory into your long-term memory. Find what strategies for doing this work best in Chapter 4. ✓ Procedural memory. Procedural memory is an automatic skill that you don’t even have to think about – like driving a car or

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