Treasury of Greek Mythology: Classic Stories of Gods, Goddesses, Heroes & Monsters

Treasury of Greek Mythology: Classic Stories of Gods, Goddesses, Heroes & Monsters

Donna Jo Napoli

Language: English

Pages: 134

ISBN: 1426308442

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Treasury of Greek Mythology: Classic Stories of Gods, Goddesses, Heroes & Monsters

Donna Jo Napoli

Language: English

Pages: 134

ISBN: 1426308442

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


School Library Journal Best Books of 2011

Eureka! Silver Honor Books—California Reading Association

Capitol Choices 2012 list of Noteworthy Titles for Children and Teens

2012 Notable Children's Books—ALSC

The new National Geographic Treasury of Greek Mythology offers timeless stories of Greek myths in a beautiful new volume. Brought to life with lyrical text by award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli and stunning artwork by award-winning illustrator Christina Balit, the tales of gods and goddesses such as Zeus, Aphrodite, Apollo, and Athena and heroes and monsters such as Helen of Troy, Perseus, and Medusa will fascinate and engage children’s imaginations.
 
National Geographic completes the book with embellishments of each story: sidebars for each god, goddess, hero, and monster link the myths to constellations, geography, history, and culture to help young readers connect the stories to real life events, people, and places. A family tree and a “cast of characters” profile page help make relationships between the characters clear, and a mapping feature adds to the fun and fascination. Resource notes and ample back matter directing readers to more information round out this luminous book. Sure to dazzle all those intrigued with the fantastic tales of Greek mythology and enchant new readers, this vibrant book will soon become a family keepsake.

National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources.
Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information.

Who Fears Death

The Mabinogion Tetralogy

Native American Mythology

Children's Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Monsters

Ancient Mysteries of Britain

The End of the Sentence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sort of thing anyone could have guessed, but there it was. Love. Then the youth Perseus appeared out of nowhere and for no reason cut off Medusa’s head, as one might slaughter a monster. If Perseus hadn’t been the son of Zeus, Poseidon might have sought revenge. What a sad event. The only good thing was that Poseidon and Medusa’s two unborn children escaped: the huge warrior Chrysaor and the winged horse Pegasus. In his grief, Poseidon fell into the arms of Medusa’s sister, the Gorgon Euryale.

human Orion. Nothing could have been more seductive. This was her only romance. Alas that it ended in bitter tragedy. Apollo, her brother, watched the developing romance with distaste. He liked his sister just the way she was—a maiden interested in the world of nature. If she changed, who knew how meddlesome she might become? So Apollo tricked Artemis. He knew that Orion went by two names, the other being Candaon. And he knew that Artemis was unaware of Orion’s other name. Now it just happened

honey. Of swooning from ambrosia. Of whirling to tinkling music. Of being dazzled by sparkles in this lightless world. So Night and Erebus fell in love, and Night gave birth to Day. And with light, in the lushness of fresh and salty water and in the expansiveness of air, life on Earth began. Grasses and vines wound their way around the globe. Bushes gently bloomed. Gaia watched Night and Erebus with envy. She felt so alone. She was the cause of all this wonder, yet none of it satisfied her. She

trapped king had his daughter beheaded, a hideous task. The winds howled and the ships sailed. A youth, but 15 years old, the son of King Peleus and the nymph Thetis, whose wedding had started this whole affair—this youth was in charge of the fleet. His name was Achilles. His mother had dipped the boy as an infant in the River Styx in Tartarus to make him immortal. But she held him by one heel, and that heel remained his point of vulnerability. When the war was declared, Thetis, convinced he’d

14.1–14.2, 16.1 and Ares 16.1, 16.2 and Athena birth 12.1, 13.1 creating women gift of Chalcotaurus bulls to King Aietes helpers inventiveness 13.1, 13.2 metalworking 85, 13.1, 16.1, 16.2, 17.1 shriveled foot 13.1–13.2 wives and children Hera (goddess of marriage) 8–9, 76–81 alignment with Zeus against Cronus 4.1–4.2 birth giving birth to Hephaestus, 12.1, 13.1 and Hercules 22.1–22.2, 22.3, 22.4, 22.5 jealousy 10.1, 12.1, 12.2, 15.1, 19.1, 21.1, 22.1 marriage to Zeus 10.1, 12.1,

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