Troublemakers

Troublemakers

Harlan Ellison

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 1497643287

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Troublemakers

Harlan Ellison

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 1497643287

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Includes the Nebula and Hugo Award–winning story, “ ‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman.”

 

A special new collection of Ellison’s short stories, selected especially for this volume by the author, including the newly revised and expanded tale “Never Send to Know for Whom the Lettuce Wilts.” In a career spanning more than fifty years, Harlan Ellison has written or edited seventy-five books, more than seventeen hundred stories, essays, articles, and newspaper columns, two dozen teleplays, and a dozen movies. Now, for the first time anywhere, Troublemakers presents a collection of Ellison’s classic stories that will introduce new readers to a writer described by the New York Times as having “the spellbinding quality of a great nonstop talker, with a cultural warehouse for a mind.” Includes the award‑winning stories “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” and “Deeper Than the Darkness.” 

 

In the Jaws of Life and Other Stories (Writings from an Unbound Europe)

The Collected Stories of Amanda Cross

The Second Randall Garrett Megapack: 19 Classic Science Fiction Stories

T.C. Boyle Stories I_ The Collected Stories of T. Coraghessan Boyle

Alexander Pope: The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

. . not to mention wasteful. Find a place for him in society? Doing what? Sims raged in his mind, mulled it over and tried every angle. It was an insoluble problem. A simple dogface, with no other life than that of a professional soldier, what good was he? All Qarlo knew was war. The question abruptly answered itself: If he knows no other life than that of a soldier . . . why, make him a soldier. (But . . . who was to say that, with his knowledge of futuristic tactics and weapons, he might

ground. At the age of seven they had to cut Henry down. He had been swinging from a clothesline strung in the basement, drying the family wash. Henry had been curious: what does it feel like to strangle? By the time he was thirteen, Henry had read every volume of the ENCYLOPAEDIA BRITTANICA, copious texts on every phase of the sciences, all matter disseminated by the government for the past twenty-eight years, and biographies by the score. Also, somewhere between seven thousand, eight hundred,

one of the windows was boarded, and that one . . . Henry realized he was looking at light streaming through the window, there on the top floor. It was blanked out for a moment, then came back. As though someone had walked in front of it. But that light's in the ceiling , Henry thought wildly. I can see the edge of the fixture from here. How can anyone walk in front of it? His wonderment was cut short by still further signs of activity in the building. A circular opening in the wall next to the

houses, the Utopia and the Lyric. We were going to the Utopia and it was only three blocks from the Center. I walked into the store with the pad of forms, and it was bedlam. David and Jan were handling two customers each, and there were people standing around waiting to be helped. Jan turned a look on me and her face was a horror-mask of pleading. David was running from the stockroom to the showroom and all he could murmur as he whipped past was "Help!" and then he was gone. "Jeffty," I said,

present, on a radio upstairs? I started to say something, and then knew . . . Oh, God . . . no ! I jumped up just as the sound of hideous crackling blotted out the music, and the table lamp dimmed and dimmed and flickered. I screamed something, I don't know what it was, and ran for the stairs. Jeffty's parents did not move. They sat there with their hands folded, in that place they had been for so many years. I fell twice rushing up the stairs. There isn't much on television that can hold my

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