Twilight and History (Wiley Pop Culture and History Series)

Twilight and History (Wiley Pop Culture and History Series)

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0470581786

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Twilight and History (Wiley Pop Culture and History Series)

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0470581786

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The first look at the history behind Stephenie Meyer's bestselling Twilight series, timed to release with the third movie, Eclipse

The characters of the Twilight Saga carry a rich history that shapes their identities and actions over the course of the series. Edward, for instance, may look like a seventeen-year-old teen heartthrob, but was actually born in 1901 and died during the Spanish Influenza of 1918. His adopted sister, Alice, was imprisoned in an insane asylum in 1920 and treated so badly there that even becoming a vampire was a welcome escape. This book is the first to explore the history behind the Twilight Saga's characters and their stories. You’ll learn about what life might have been like for Jasper Whitlock Hale, the Confederate vampire who fought during the Civil War, Carlisle Cullen, the Puritan witch hunter-turned-vampire who participated in the witchcraft persecutions in Early Modern England, and the history of the Quileute culture that shaped Jacob and his people —and much more.

  • Gives you the historical backdrop for Twilight Saga characters and events
  • Adds a whole new dimension to the Twilight novels and movies
  • Offers fresh insights on vampires, romance, and history

Twilight and History is an essential companion for every Twilight fan, whether you've just gotten into the series or have followed it since the beginning.

Rolling Stone, Issue 1236 (04 June 2015)

The Philosophy of Science Fiction Film (The Philosophy of Popular Culture)

The Philosophy of The X-Files (The Philosophy of Popular Culture)

Woody Allen and Philosophy: You Mean My Whole Fallacy Is Wrong? (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

The Psychology of the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo: Understanding Lisbeth Salander and Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy (Psychology of Popular Culture)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

become a stage of life that lasted for many years; it usually included high school attendance and the pursuit of many diverse interests, including popular music, dating, emerging technologies, fashion, and establishing one’s own identity. For many twentieth-century teens, sports and other games became a primary focus of their leisure time, as well. For some, the teen years were also a time of experimenting with drinking, sex, and drugs; this sort of experimentation had characterized earlier

physical frustration. The tension escalates when Bella discovers she is pregnant with a half-vampire that grows at an alarming rate. Edward urges Bella to abort the unnatural fetus, and she refuses—a decision that sparked controversy among both readers and critics. Bella gives birth to a daughter, Renesmée, and Edward turns Bella into a vampire to save her life after a messy, fanged caesarian section. The rest of the novel focuses on Bella’s adaptation to the vampiric lifestyle and the political

from reproducing. By 1933, all U.S. states had outlawed marriages between those people deemed insane, since it was assumed that they would hand down their diseases to their children. The belief that insanity came from a defect in the family’s genetic history brought about the fear that the flaw would continue to manifest itself from one generation to the next. The mentally ill, therefore, presented what was perceived as a real danger. The laws, however, did little good, since they were difficult

in banking.2 Indeed, the spectacle would have been worthy of the city’s ruler; yet it was not Cosimo de’ Medici’s burial that was being solemnized, nor his coffin that the Medici guards were escorting. In Cosimo’s presence, innumerable people paid their last respects to another man who had shaped and dominated Florence perhaps almost as much as the Medici—Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, known to most by only his first name: Michelangelo. In fact, Michelangelo had died at the age of

since he hardly ever left the town of Naples, and the depiction of gods was not a specialty of his. Be that as it may: even if Edward is (as it is his habit) allowing his desire to protect Bella to rule him, and thus avoids revealing too much in order to not spook Bella, it is telling that he chooses those particular words to characterize the Volturi: “nighttime patrons of the arts.” This is the phrase that Bella recalls later when the Volturi, now called by their “family name,” come up again in

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