Understanding Color: An Introduction for Designers

Understanding Color: An Introduction for Designers

Linda Holtzschue

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: B00D0YYM02

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Understanding Color: An Introduction for Designers

Linda Holtzschue

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: B00D0YYM02

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Make Sound Color Choices

Now in an updated Fourth Edition, Understanding Color helps you connect the dots between your emotional, intuitive responses to color and the theories that explain them. From this authoritative and easy-to-follow resource, you'll learn how to use color more comfortably, creatively, and effectively than ever before.

Take your work to the next level by exploring how different light sources affect color rendition, how placement changes color, how to avoid costly color mistakes, and how to resolve the color problems that frequently confront design professionals. This edition is full of powerful new features that reflect the latest issues in color and design, including:

  • Expanded and revised content in nearly 35% of the book.
  • Coverage of a broad range of design disciplines.
  • Ideas from the major color theorists that reinforce content, rather than emphasizing what is correct or incorrect.
  • Discussion of color created by traditional media and digital design, and the issues that arise when design moves from one medium to another.
  • Innovative coverage of color marketing issues.
  • Helpful tips for using color in the working environment.
  • An online workbook with valuable exercises that reinforce color concepts.

Understanding Color, Fourth Edition is an unparalleled source of authoritative information and practical solutions for students and professionals in all fields of design.

Home Style by City: Ideas and Inspiration from Paris, London, New York, Los Angeles, and Copenhagen

Designing Search: UX Strategies for eCommerce Success

Laminated Designs in Wood: Techniques, Patterns, Projects

Game Mechanics: Advanced Game Design (Voices That Matter)

Universal Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

quantity of light emitted by a light source can be measured. Sensations are also measurable. An individual’s ability to detect light is measured as visual acuity, or sharpness of vision. Visual acuity is the ability to sense patterns of light and dark and to resolve detail. It is a measure of the weakest light stimulus that an individual can detect. The ability to see differences between dark and light is not the same as visual acuity for color. Someone who can discriminate very small

or mail-order catalog color options, are color collections. The number of samples can vary widely. Coats and Clark, for example, offers more than 900 colors of sewing thread in its Global Colour Reference of Industrial Apparel Thread Shades. Old Village, a specialty paint company, offers only 25 paint colors, each painstakingly created to simulate an historic original, along with a very few colors in specialty products like buttermilk paint. There are countless numbers of these limited color

and reflecting others. A base modifies color by absorbing, scattering, or reflecting general light. Color qualities like translucency, opacity, and chalkiness depend many times on the light-modifying qualities of the base. Watercolor and crayon are examples of media whose differences come largely from the modifying quality of the base. Water is a colorless substance that transmits light. It evaporates completely after it is applied, leaving the colorant essentially unmodified. A brilliant dye

woad. The colors and palettes of most cultures were determined by locally available materials, and early palettes had a sort of ethnic identity. Despite the hardships of early travel and trade, a slow but steady exchange of colors and color influences took place between East and West. Early Crusaders brought turquoise to Europe from the Near East; the Portugese brought indigo from India. Returning travelers, soldiers, and explorers added colors to the Western color canon. The expansion of

coloring identity and color Pure color, See Saturated color Pythagorus R Reflectance Reflection Rendering traditional computer Retina Rods S Safety colors Saturated color diluting with black diluting with gray diluting with the complement diluting with white Sampling Saturation harmony and spatial effects of Scales, chromatic monochromatic saturation value Scattering Schlemmer, Max Schopenhauer, Arthur Screen display Screen images Internet distribution of

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