Visual Models for Software Requirements (Developer Best Practices)

Visual Models for Software Requirements (Developer Best Practices)

Joy Beatty

Language: English

Pages: 480

ISBN: 0735667721

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Visual Models for Software Requirements (Developer Best Practices)

Joy Beatty

Language: English

Pages: 480

ISBN: 0735667721

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Apply best practices for capturing, analyzing, and implementing software requirements through visual models—and deliver better results for your business. The authors—experts in eliciting and visualizing requirements—walk you through a simple but comprehensive language of visual models that has been used on hundreds of real-world, large-scale projects. Build your fluency with core concepts—and gain essential, scenario-based context and implementation advice—as you progress through each chapter.

  • Transcend the limitations of text-based requirements data using visual models that more rigorously identify, capture, and validate requirements
  • Get real-world guidance on best ways to use visual models—how and when, and ways to combine them for best project outcomes
  • Practice the book’s concepts as you work through chapters
  • Change your focus from writing a good requirement to ensuring a complete system

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features and requirements. Feature Trees show all of the features at once, giving a quick view of the solution’s breadth of functionality. Further, organizing the features in this model makes it is easier to identify missing features and redundant features. Finally, the Feature Tree provides a functional decomposition of the solution for use throughout all phases of the project, including organization of the requirements, organization of work around the requirements (planning), and bounding of

those from the packaged software. Common Mistakes The following represent the most common mistakes that we have seen with Feature Trees. Wrong Number of Features at Each Level A common mistake is having the wrong number of features at any one level. The 7 +/- 2 number is critical to making Feature Trees consumable, so be sure that there are no more than 10 subfeatures under any feature. Further, if there are only one or two features at each level, either there are missing subfeatures at the L2

7+/-2 requirements, then you generally don’t need additional levels of process detail. 132 PART III  People Models If your L3 Process Flow details a step that is performed by a single user or user group, you do not need swim lanes, but consider using swim lanes anyway if that helps make the process clear to readers. Using Process Flows Process Flows facilitate communication with project stakeholders in both business and IT organizations because the flows are aligned with the way most people

Ontario, Canada. Object Management Group (OMG). 2011. Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) version 2.0. http://www.omg.org/spec/BPMN/2.0. 138 PART III  People Models CHAPTER 10 Use Case I recently had a meeting with my architect, who is helping me build a new beach house. The conversation I had with the architect went like this: Architect: How do you see yourself using the beach house beyond the usual house uses? Me: Well, after a day at the beach, I’m worried about tracking sand in

playlist object?“ That could lead you to identify a Use Case describing the sharing of playlists with friends or with social networks. From Org Charts or Lists of Actors The roles in the Org Chart should be reviewed as well, to consider what activities those roles need to perform in the system. Also, look for additional actors who might trigger the identification of additional Use Cases. The following questions can be used to identify actors with Use Cases: ■■ Who uses the system? ■■ What is

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