War Is a Racket: The Antiwar Classic by America's Most Decorated Soldier

War Is a Racket: The Antiwar Classic by America's Most Decorated Soldier

Language: English

Pages: 224

ISBN: 1626361053

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

War Is a Racket: The Antiwar Classic by America's Most Decorated Soldier

Language: English

Pages: 224

ISBN: 1626361053

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


War Is a Racket is the title of two works, a speech and a booklet, by retired US Marine Corps Major General and two-time Medal of Honor recipient Smedley Darlington Butler. In these works, Butler frankly discusses from his experience as a career military officer how business interests commercially benefit from warfare. After his retirement from the Marine Corps, Gen. Butler made a nationwide tour in the early 1930s giving his speech, “War Is a Racket.” The speech was so well received that he wrote a longer version that was published in 1935, now republished with a foreword by former governor of Minnesota and New York Times bestselling author Jesse Ventura.

Jesse Ventura reviews Major General Butler’s original writings and brings them up to date, relating them to our current political climate. Butler was a visionary in his day, and Ventura works to show how right he was and how wrong our current democracy is. Read for the first time Butler’s words with Ventura’s witty, yet insightful spin on this relevant work that will appeal not only to military historians, but also to those interested in the state of our country and the entire world.

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. . ) die and are ( . . . ) on the ( . . . ) left behind ( . . . ) those whose financial condition would benefit ( . . . ) to lose. Appealing peace slogans must be coined and there could be nothing more potent than, “Attend to our own business.” Then the question is—”What is our own business?” To answer that we must first decide what is meant by that word “Our.” I contend that “Our,” where war is concerned, refers to the people who do the fighting—those who make the sacrifices in blood and

from and experience that a beer income is insufficient for champagne tastes. The thrill of “keeping up with the Joneses” can only be temporary, because sooner or later the sheriff or the wolf is waiting at the doorstep. Our politicians and our economic experts may be able to cite a thousand different reasons for our present plight. They can probably likewise suggest a thousand different economic prescriptions. They can point to statistics from here to the 165 moon, and recite theories from now

all sections of the country. It is neither fair, nor equitable, to force any one particular state,and its citizens, to assume the major burden of this expense. In the eighteen years since the Armistice, World War veterans have moved from one state to another, seeking climatic conditions that are best suited to their health. In the southwest alone, thousands of veterans from other sections of the 180 country have settled to live in the only climate that offers relief from tubercular

success and bigger pay envelopes. The second class of militarists in this country is composed of bankers who specialize in foreign investments, owners of ships that travel the high seas, exporters who make their profits through world trade, the makers of munitions and those who deal in commodities the government always needs in tremendous quantities when it goes to war, such as cotton, oil and wheat. All of these have exclusively selfish objectives in view, and they want Uncle Sam ton have the

and kill and kill . . . and be killed. But wait! Half of that wage (just a little more in a month than a riveter in a shipyard or a laborer in a munitions factory safe at home made in a day) was promptly taken from him to support his dependents, so that they would not become a charge upon his community. Then we made him pay what amounted to accident insurance—something the employer pays for in an enlightened state—and that cost him $6 a month. He had less than $9 a month left. Then, the most

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