Weaving and Binding: Immigrant Gods and Female Immortals in Ancient Japan

Weaving and Binding: Immigrant Gods and Female Immortals in Ancient Japan

Michael Como

Language: English

Pages: 306

ISBN: 0824829573

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Weaving and Binding: Immigrant Gods and Female Immortals in Ancient Japan

Michael Como

Language: English

Pages: 306

ISBN: 0824829573

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Argues that both the Japanese royal system and the Japanese Buddhist tradition owe much to continental rituals centered on the manipulation of yin and yang, animal sacrifice, and spirit quelling. This book charts an epochal transformation in the religious culture of the Japanese islands.

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the] Upper Kamo Shrine is called Wake no Ikazuchi no Kami. The [god of the] Lower Kamo Shrine is called Mioya no Kami. The arrow above the door was the Matsuno’o Daimyòjin. Thus the Hata worship the gods in these three places.6 Although no one today would accept this account as historical reality, the text is remarkable for its bald assertion that all the deities of the Kamo shrines were Hata ancestors. Although the text does continue by noting that the Kamo frequently intermarried with the Hata

Haruo Shirane, Chun-fang Yu, and Mark Taylor, upon each of whom I have relied for advice and encouragement for so very long. I would also like to express my deepest appreciation and gratitude for the aid, instruction, and encouragement given to me these many years by Bernard Faure, who as teacher, colleague, and friend has been all that anyone could hope for and more. This project was also made possible by generous support by the U.S.Japan Fulbright Commission, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation,

and at night he had a dream in which a loom [kutsubiki] and a shuttle [tatari] came dancing before Azeko, pushing him. At this he knew that the god was a female weaving deity and immediately built a shrine and worshipped her. After that travelers were no longer killed on the roadsides. For this reason, the shrine was called Himegoso (the princess’s shrine) and today, the village takes its name from the shrine.48 This tale of divine wrath and propitiation speaks volumes about the role of weaving

on a boat to bring them home. On the way home he suddenly fell ill and got off the boat. Thinking he would go on alone, he hired a horse and set out. 52 Weaving and Binding When he reached Shiga no karasaki, Takashima district, Òmi province, he looked around and saw three men half a furlong away running after him. At the Uji Bridge of Yamashiro, they caught up and went along with him. Iwashima asked them: “Where are you going?” They replied, “We are messengers from the office of King Yama

Others say it is the god of Sumisaka in Uda. You are a man of exceeding strength. Go and seize [the god] and bring it back.” Sugaru said “I shall attempt to go and seize him.” He then climbed Mount Mimuro and seized a large snake, which he showed to the tennò. The tennò, [however] had not observed any taboos, so the snake’s thunder sounded and its eyeballs flashed. The tennò was terrified and covered his eyes and did not look [at it]. He then fled into the palace and had [the snake] released on a

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