Welcome to the Jungle: Everything You Wanted to Know about Bipolar But Were Too Freaked Out to Ask

Welcome to the Jungle: Everything You Wanted to Know about Bipolar But Were Too Freaked Out to Ask

Hilary Smith

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 2:00293656

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Welcome to the Jungle: Everything You Wanted to Know about Bipolar But Were Too Freaked Out to Ask

Hilary Smith

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 2:00293656

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Bipolar is currently the most commonly diagnosed emotional/psychiatric condition, and diagnosis tends to come when one is in one's late teens or early 20s. And yet almost nothing has been written about it from eye level and a young person's perspective. This book brilliantly fills that gap.

"When I was diagnosed at age 19, my parents went to a bookstore and bought me a pile of books about bipolar. I threw them away in disgust (actually, exchanged them for books of poetry)—not because I wasn't curious about bipolar, but because all the books treated the subject with clinical rubber gloves. They were dry, annoying, and made me feel like a disease, not a person. I wrote this book because it's the book I should have been given when I was diagnosed."

With chapters of advice on everything from how to get off the floor after the blow of a bipolar diagnosis to how to think about psychiatry and manage your meds to how to deal with thoughts of suicide to "hippy shit" like meditation, herbs, and other non-medical bipolar helpers to navigating the healthcare system, this is the first self-help book by a bipolar young adult to other bipolar young adults.

Bipolar Disorder (A Guide for Patients and Families) (3rd Edition)

Inside Out and Outside In: Psychodynamic Clinical Theory and Psychopathology in Contemporary Multicultural Contexts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

think you're better when you're not, or temporarily filling you with disdain for the very treatment that's been keeping your sorry ass out of the hospital for the past six months. Just having bipolar disorder can cause your normal worldview to fluctuate, leading you to play all sorts of games to justify your new worldview. (Parents and significant others, are you listening? Your bipolar kid/boyfriend/girlfriend isn't stupid or crazy for irrationally wanting to go off medication. It's just another

that his hungover roommate is lazy, that he (martyr roommate) has to do everything himself, and that nobody appreciates him. The martyr roommate sets the game in motion by cleaning up before anyone has a chance to help, thereby ensuring that he will maintain his martyr status. The game winds up with the hungover roommate delivering the strokes (“You cleaned it all by yourself?”, “I would have helped!”) that the martyr roommate wanted all along. Going off meds comes with its own set of strokes,

really more important to me than arbitrarily keeping myself in a state of reduced or altered functioning. For example: “I can't let myself be this wrecked next week, we have to get an issue of the newspaper out!” or “Insomnia is giving me deep spiritual insights, but I'd better sleep so I'm not too cracked out for my date Friday night.” You should think about your priorities. Is the value of being off meds greater than the value of having a stable and productive life? Is being off meds more

will counteract this effect by encouraging honest interactions and a certain amount of casual conversation amid the bipolar talk. But a bad moderator will compound this effect by divining a pathological, bipolar reason for everything you say and do. With this warning in mind, you should be able to tell a good or bad support group when you see one. Ideally, a support group is an arena in which you have full license to talk about your bipolar-related issues with people who have similar experiences

do the above even when you don't think you feel like it. Talk yourself through the steps in a kind, gentle inner voice like Granny's: “All right sweetie, now just put your shoes on. OK now walk outside. . . .” Your body feels like it. Your manager feels like it. Another good strategy for getting exercise is enlisting a friend. Get him/her to show up at your house every night before basketball practice so you can go together. Sign up for an aerobics class together. You don't want your friend to

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