What Designers Know

What Designers Know

Bryan Lawson

Language: English

Pages: 140

ISBN: 0750664487

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

What Designers Know

Bryan Lawson

Language: English

Pages: 140

ISBN: 0750664487

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Each chapter deals with a different technique from which we can best represent and make explicit the forms of knowledge used by designers. The book explores whether design knowledge is special, and attempts to get to the root of where design knowledge comes from. Crucially, it focuses on how designers use drawings in communicating their ideas and how they ‘converse’ with them as their designs develop. It also shows how experienced designers use knowledge differently to novices suggesting that design ‘expertise’ can be developed. Overall, this book builds a layout of the kinds of skill, knowledge and understanding that make up what we call designing.

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look at it’. Designers describe this also as temporarily freezing something in order to explore the implications of it. The drawing then seems to ‘talk back’ to the designer and the conversation proceeds. We shall return to that in a little while. First, let us explore more of the nature and characteristics of proposition drawings and the kinds of knowledge they embody. Some have argued that in general these drawings change as the design process proceeds from vague and sketchy to more precise.

maximizing sunlight, view and privacy offers another such example (Auger, 1972). Strathclyde University’s programs designed layouts for schools given a timetable of classes. These programs actually proposed designs with the human designer relegated to the support role of resolving, tidying and rationalizing after the computer had proposed the main ideas. The assumption was that somehow the computer designed propositions would be arrived at more quickly, with less effort and be more optimal than

All this is leading us on to a further distinction in memory between that which is symbolic and that which is episodic. Put simply we seem to store information quite differently about theories and rules to the way we remember events and occasions. It turns out that this has enormous significance for understanding the nature of design knowledge. That is the subject of the next chapter. 8 Theoretical and experiential knowledge in design Everything that is absorbed and registered in your mind adds

All this is leading us on to a further distinction in memory between that which is symbolic and that which is episodic. Put simply we seem to store information quite differently about theories and rules to the way we remember events and occasions. It turns out that this has enormous significance for understanding the nature of design knowledge. That is the subject of the next chapter. 8 Theoretical and experiential knowledge in design Everything that is absorbed and registered in your mind adds

Graphic Designers and Artists. London, Butterworth Architecture. Rumelhart, D. E. and D. A. Norman (1983). Representation in memory. In Handbook of Experimental Psychology. R. C. Atkinson, R. J. Herrnstein, G. Lindzey and R. D. Luce. New York, Wiley. Schank, R. C. (1982). Dynamic Memory. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Schön, D. A. (1983). The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action. London, Temple Smith. Schön, D. A. (1984). ‘Problems, frames and perspectives on

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