Wholeness and the Implicate Order

Wholeness and the Implicate Order

David Bohm

Language: English

Pages: 284

ISBN: 0415289793

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Wholeness and the Implicate Order

David Bohm

Language: English

Pages: 284

ISBN: 0415289793

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


David Bohm was one of the foremost scientific thinkers and philosophers of our time. Although deeply influenced by Einstein, he was also, more unusually for a scientist, inspired by mysticism. Indeed, in the 1970s and 1980s he made contact with both J. Krishnamurti and the Dalai Lama whose teachings helped shape his work. In both science and philosophy, Bohm's main concern was with understanding the nature of reality in general and of consciousness in particular. In this classic work he develops a theory of quantum physics which treats the totality of existence as an unbroken whole. Writing clearly and without technical jargon, he makes complex ideas accessible to anyone interested in the nature of reality.

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variable theory 122–33 S-matrices 170 scientific research fragmentation in 4, 19 scientific theories see theories, scientific Siegel, A. 274 signals in relativity theory 156, 171–3 simplex 210 space as full 242–5 specialization 1–2 stream of consciousness 14 ‘structation’ 152 structure: in classical physics 153–5; as development from order and measure 151–3 Stuart, A. 275 subject-verb-object structure 37, 39 sub-quantum mechanical level: experiments to probe 133–8; see also hidden

have a negligible influence on the general magnitudes of the basic random fluctuations. (Thus, the presence of matter as we know it on a large scale would mean the concentration of a non-fluctuating part of the energy, associated with a few extra grams per cubic centimetre on top of the infinite zero-point fluctuations of the ‘vacuum’ field.) With regard to the problem of different levels of space and time intervals, however, the assumption of the universality of b is not so plausible. Thus, it

all the variables, xli, of the infinity of clocks within clocks. As before, we then write where l′ represents all possible levels. For the constants of the motion, we write where the integrals are carried over suitable contours. Each of these constants of the motion is now built up out of circuit integrals involving pi δxi, but as we saw, each one of these clocks must satisfy the phase condition ∮pµ δxµ = 2nπℏ around any circuit. Hence the sum satisfies such a condition, which in turn must be

shows that the attempt to describe and follow an atomic particle in precise detail has little meaning. (Further detail on this point is given in chapter 5.) The notion of an atomic path has only a limited domain of applicability. In a more detailed description the atom is, in many ways, seen to behave as much like a wave as a particle. It can perhaps best be regarded as a poorly defined cloud, dependent for its particular form on the whole environment, including the observing instrument. Thus,

opposed by Democritus, who was perhaps the first seriously to propose a world view that conceived of space as emptiness (i.e., the void) in which material particles (e.g., atoms) are free to move. Modern science has generally favoured this latter atomistic view, and yet, during the nineteenth century, the former view was also seriously entertained, through the hypothesis of an ether that fills all space. Matter, thought of as consisting of special recurrent stable and separable forms in the ether

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