Who's Who in Classical Mythology (Who's Who (Routledge))

Who's Who in Classical Mythology (Who's Who (Routledge))

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0415260418

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Who's Who in Classical Mythology (Who's Who (Routledge))

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0415260418

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Who's Who in Classical Mythology is the most complete and detailed reference book of its kind. It offers scholarly, yet accessible accounts of those mythological tales surrounding such gods as Apollo, Zeus, Athena and Dionysus, and mortals such as Achilles, Odysseus, Jason, Aeneas, Romulus and Remus and Tarquin.
It contains over 1200 extensive entries, covering both Greek and Roman characters, providing detailed biographical information, together with historical and geographical background. In addition there are comprehensive genealogical trees of important mythological families and a detailed list of all Greek and Latin writers referred to in the text.

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king Tantalus; and he added three new strings to the four which the lyre had previously possessed. When the twins were fully grown, Antiope escaped from her long captivity and made herself known to her sons, who determined to avenge her and raised an army to attack Thebes. They killed (or expelled) Lycus, who was now accing as regent for Laius after the death of Labdacus. They also tied his wife Dirce to the horns of a bull—the fate which she had intended for Antiope. Amphion and Zethus now made

too suffered a violent death. Aphrodite also punished the Muse Clio, who laughed at her for her passion for the mortal Adonis: for she made Clio like-wise fall in love with a mortal, Pierus. The Muse Calliope, who had adjudicated between the rival claims to Adonis of Persephone and herself, was punished by the death of her son Orpheus. Aphrodite also penalised the goddess of dawn, Eos, who had lain with Aphrodite’s lover Ares, by making her fall in love with two mortals, Cephalus and Tithonus.

Then, according to this tradition, she abandoned him on Mount Myrtium, where he was suckled by a flock of goats and found and reared by their herdsman, although he was terrified to see lightning flashes coming from the infant’s body. In Messenia it was claimed that Asclepius’ mother was Arsinoe, daughter of Leucippus. Asclepius married Epione and had two sons, Machaon and Podalirius, both of whom fought at Troy and tended the wounded. In spite of his divinity, Asclepius was believed to have died.

in Athens; his works were so lifelike that they appeared real. His sister gave him her son Perdix (also called Talus or Calus) as his apprentice. But the boy proved an even better craftsman than Daedalus himself, for he invented the saw (by copying the bone of a snake’s jaw, or the backbone of a fish), the geometrician’s compass, and the potter’s wheel. In consequence Daedalus killed his nephew in a fit of jealousy, pushing him off the Acropolis or over a cliff into the sea. Athena, who had loved

to her by making him drunk. For this infidelity Nais struck him blind. He tried to console himself by singing of his misfortunes to the people of the countryside, setting his music to the syrinx (pipes of Pan). Finally, however, he fell into the River Anapus; and because he had broken his vow to Nais, the nymphs of the river allowed him to drown. Who’s who in classical mythology 164 There are variants of this story. According to one version, Daphnis wasted away with unrequited love for Xenia.

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