Wild Mammals in Captivity: Principles and Techniques for Zoo Management, Second Edition

Wild Mammals in Captivity: Principles and Techniques for Zoo Management, Second Edition

Language: English

Pages: 592

ISBN: 0226440109

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Wild Mammals in Captivity: Principles and Techniques for Zoo Management, Second Edition

Language: English

Pages: 592

ISBN: 0226440109

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


 

Zoos, aquaria, and wildlife parks are vital centers of animal conservation and management. For nearly fifteen years, these institutions have relied on Wild Mammals in Captivity as the essential reference for their work. Now the book reemerges in a completely updated second edition. Wild Mammals in Captivity presents the most current thinking and practice in the care and management of wild mammals in zoos and other institutions. In one comprehensive volume, the editors have gathered the most current information from studies of animal behavior; advances in captive breeding; research in physiology, genetics, and nutrition; and new thinking in animal management and welfare.

            In this edition, more than three-quarters of the text is new, and information from more than seventy-five contributors is thoroughly updated. The standard text for all courses in zoo biology, Wild Mammals in Captivity will, in its new incarnation, continue to be used by zoo managers, animal caretakers, researchers, and anyone with an interest in how to manage animals in captive conditions. 

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mammals. A major mineral constituent of the mammalian endoskeleton is calcium. Dietary calcium is essential for proper bone formation in mammals as well as for many other physiological functions. The exoskeleton of insects contains a very low concentration of calcium, as does the whole insect body (table .). Thus, when insects are fed to mammals, the amount of calcium (and other nutrients) is too low to meet nutritional requirements. Bone abnormalities (e.g. osteomalacia and rickets) are a

food-related hazards, including physical, chemical, and biological contaminants, will prevent potential illnesses and death. Based on location, international, federal, state, and local agencies have authority over facilities that maintain captive mammals, and thus it is prudent to be aware of the policies, responsibilities, and guidance of each. Whereas many captive-animal care facilities are held to specific standards, the suppliers of the food items included in their animal diets are, in many

dealing with many of the daily aspects of managing mammals, as well as for coping with emergencies. This section provides chapters on the processes involved in restraining and moving mammals, incorporating enrichment into husbandry, responding to threats from emerging diseases, and developing safety programs to reduce the risk that either animals or humans will be harmed through their regular interactions. Of note is the greater consideration given to developing clear goals and objectives,

since longer-lasting enrichments had greater, not lesser, effects. In no cases was stereotypic behavior eliminated, but these reductions in stereotypic behavior are strong evidence of the effectiveness of enrichment at improving well-being. Good examples of these kinds of studies include the use of timed feeders for Amur tigers, Panthera tigris altaica (Jenny and Schmid ), more naturalistic enclosures for pandas (Liu et al. ), live fish and bones provided for lions and Sumatran tigers,

deadly weapons to a dangerous animal escape. Zoos must realize that public safety is their first priority (Murphy ). How do you get the word out to everyone and in a quick and efficient manner? Many zoos use the term red before the name of an animal to alert all staff members, over a loudspeaker or via radio, of a dangerous-animal emergency. Some zoos (Lincoln Park Zoo a) place large boxes or trunks at key locations on the grounds; these contain all the materials that staff potentially

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