Writing Fiction: The Practical Guide from New York's Acclaimed Creative Writing School

Writing Fiction: The Practical Guide from New York's Acclaimed Creative Writing School

Gotham Writers' Workshop

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1582343306

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Writing Fiction: The Practical Guide from New York's Acclaimed Creative Writing School

Gotham Writers' Workshop

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1582343306

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Gotham Writers' Workshop has mastered the art of teaching the craft of writing in a way that is practical, accessible, and entertaining. Now the techniques of this renowned school are available in this book.

Here you'll find:
- The fundamental elements of fiction craft-character, plot, point of view, etc.-explained clearly and completely
- Key concepts illustrated with passages from great works of fiction
- The complete text of "Cathedral" by Raymond Carver-a masterpiece of contemporary short fiction that is analyzed throughout the book
- Exercises that let you immediately apply what you learn to your own writing

Written by Gotham Writers' Workshop expert instructors and edited by Dean of Faculty Alexander Steele, Writing Fiction offers the same methods and exercises that have earned the school international acclaim.

Once you've read-and written-your way through this book, you'll have a command of craft that will enable you to turn your ideas into effective short stories and novels.

You will be a writer.

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long tails. This pageant was part of a procession. The Englishman who was narrating the thing said it took place in Spain once a year. I tried to explain to the blind man what was happening. “Skeletons,” he said. “I know about skeletons,” he said, and he nodded. The TV showed this one cathedral. Then there was a long, slow look at another one. Finally, the picture switched to the famous one in Paris, with its flying buttresses and its spires reaching up to the clouds. The camera pulled away to

piercing him. The hat was new and had cost her seven dollars and a half She kept saying, “Maybe I shouldn’t have paid that for it. No, I shouldn’t have. I’ll take it off and return it tomorrow. I shouldn’t have bought it.” Julian raised his eyes to heaven. “Yes, you should have bought it,” he said. “Put it on and let’s go.” It was a hideous hat. A purple velvet flap came down on one side of it and stood up on the other; the rest of it was green and looked like a cushion with the stuffing out. He

elocution. Stress openness, non-exclusivity. Make room in his closet, but don’t rearrange the furniture. Imagine what you could do with this. What would be the title of your “self-help” short story? I must tell you, however, that the second person is closely associated with Mclnerney and Moore. Second person has possibilities and it’s quite fun to use, but if their goal is publication, it’s up to other writers to make it their own—to make it fresh—by using it to create a different effect. One

use and make sure your word choices are working with the general type of voice that you have chosen. But don’t worry about it too much as you’re writing away. You can always go back and take out any incongruous fellas that sneak in. SENTENCES Words alone don’t create the voice; how they’re thrown together into a sentence is what really gives writing its flow. I’ll tell you something surprising: how you place words in a sentence is the most important stylistic choice you’ll make. A sentence is

your desktop, next to your computer, a stack of pages sprinkled with words—your words. Maybe you worked in a white heat, following Jack Kerouac’s famous dictum “First thought, best thought,” flinging sentences like Jackson Pollock flinging paint. Or else you worked cautiously, glacially, like William Styron, who, writing his extra-long novels, felt compelled to hone each sentence to perfection before proceeding to the next, his perfected prose accruing like plaque on the teeth. Either way, you

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