Writing in Context(s): Textual Practices and Learning Processes in Sociocultural Settings (Studies in Writing)

Writing in Context(s): Textual Practices and Learning Processes in Sociocultural Settings (Studies in Writing)

Language: English

Pages: 280

ISBN: 0387242376

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Writing in Context(s): Textual Practices and Learning Processes in Sociocultural Settings (Studies in Writing)

Language: English

Pages: 280

ISBN: 0387242376

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The premise that writing is a socially-situated act of interaction between readers and writers is well established. This volume first, corroborates this premise by citing pertinent evidence, through the analysis of written texts and interactive writing contexts, and from educational settings across different cultures from which we have scant evidence. Secondly, all chapters, though addressing the social nature of writing, propose a variety of perspectives, making the volume multidisciplinary in nature. Finally, this volume accounts for the diversity of the research perspectives each chapter proposes by situating the plurality of terminological issues and methodologies into a more integrative framework. Thus a coherent overall framework is created within which different research strands (i.e., the sociocognitive, sociolinguistic research, composition work, genre analysis) and pedagogical practices developed on L1 and L2 writing can be situated and acquire meaning.

This volume will be of particular interest to researchers in the areas of language and literacy education in L1 and L2, applied linguists interested in school, and academic contexts of writing, teacher educators and graduate students working in the fields of L1 and L2 writing.

Elements of Screenwriting: A Guide for Film and Television Writing

The Artist's Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity

Chicken Soup for the Writer's Soul: Stories to Open the Heart and Rekindle the Spirit of Writers

Writing Places: The Life Journey of a Writer and Teacher

Writing and Cognition: Research and Applications (Studies in Writing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

de nous pent oter une pierre du mur de I'exclusion. Etant donn6 que parler de ce fleau c'est en reconnaitre la presence, c'est que nous pouvons trouver des remedes. En particulier pour les exemples qui nous touchent de pr6s, comme les personnes sans-logis auxquels nous ne faisons pas attention par "habitude", ou bien devant lesquelles nous detournons le regard par honte. Eh bien: ayons honte! Mais ne restons pas indiff6rents. Osons regarder le probleme pour y trouver en son coeur les solutions.

by several authors (e.g., Carraher, 1984, 1986, 1987; Purcell-Gates, 1996; Teale, 1986). At school, these children had more contact with stories than with letters and newspaper articles. Street children, on the other hand, had more contact with newspaper articles than with texts belonging to the other genres. Even though illiterate on school standards, these children "read" the news in newspapers placed on the front door of state agents in the street corners through the literate teenagers who

own experiences and interests than writing an invitational letter to a celebrity, the task for the writer in Figure 1. This difference in the relative authenticity of the two tasks (adding another way of reflecting upon children's prior knowledge) may, in part, account for some of the differences in the written texts. But what about other types of tasks children encounter mainly in school and indeed in secondary school? Consider the genre of explanation or science report. In reporting about

members negotiate specific meanings; through repeated interactions, members establish a certain community-valued perspective towards written texts. Attention is not directed to units as situated against contexts but rather to contextualization in Gumperz's sense, i.e., to the processes by which any given unit emerges out of contexts which this unit signals and helps construct. Alternatively, we could argue that in research following along these lines, the unit of analysis selected is not the

occasional personalized examples transformed into generalized ones, overall structures organized along present versus past binary lines, and build on (assumed) shared values and perspectives, sometimes in ways that seem to recreate stereotypes. ^ "Average " is used here in descriptive ways, as opposed to statistical ways - to indicate that we are looking at student texts which are not far outside of the norm, neither outstanding nor judged as problematic by readers who are teachers. This means

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