Writing Program Administration (Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition)

Writing Program Administration (Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition)

Language: English

Pages: 172

ISBN: 1602350078

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Writing Program Administration (Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition)

Language: English

Pages: 172

ISBN: 1602350078

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This reference guide provides a comprehensive review of the literature on all the issues, responsibilities, and opportunities that writing program administrators need to understand, manage, and enact, including budgets, personnel, curriculum, assessment, teacher training and supervision, and more. WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION also provides the first comprehensive history of writing program administration in U.S. higher education. WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION includes a helpful glossary of terms and an annotated bibliography for further reading. Written by a WPA who has also served in other administrative positions (department chair and associate dean), the book takes a broad perspective on the work of the WPA. It is an indispensable guide for experienced and new writing program administrators alike. Students new to the study of writing program administration will find it to be their essential guide to its history and to their own professionalization. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Susan H. McLeod is Professor of Writing and Director of the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has published widely on writing across the curriculum and composition. Her most recent book is COMPOSING A COMMUNITY: A HISTORY OF WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM (Parlor Press, 2006), which she edited with Margot Soven.

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Composition programs” (“Finding” 133). Let us first consider size. Although the growing size of the student body during the period before World War II was not nearly at the rate that it would be after the G.I. Bill, the increases were still considerable. As John Heyda notes, in 1870 there were 52,000 students enrolled in all institutions of higher education in the United States. A decade later the figure had risen by 131 percent to 116,000. During the 1880s it rose another 35 percent, in the

extramural grants, over and above the amount requested for the proposed project, to cover overhead and services provided by the university. The money covers very real costs to the institution; depending on the institution and the granting agency, the indirect cost recovery may be 50 percent or more of the amount requested for the proposed project. Institutional Assessment (or Institutional/University Research)— The office that compiles data and statistics on enrollments, retention rates,

Blechman. Higher Education Administration: A Guide to Legal, Ethical, and Practical Issues. The Greenwood Educators’ Reference Collection. Westport, CN.: Greenwood Press, 1999. Goonen and Blechman strike a balance between describing legal obligations, discussing ethical complexities, and making clear practical suggestions for administrators. Chapters address the hiring process, issues of compensation and continuing employment, tenure and promotion, terminating employees, academic freedom,

86 current-traditional rhetoric, 5, 24, 27–28, 38–39, 42, 47, 52, 60, 67, 82, 90, 133n curriculum, 4, 9, 16, 25–28, 30– 31, 35, 37–38, 41, 43–44, 47, 155 51, 54–55, 59, 62, 73, 81–89, 96–97, 99, 102, 117–120, 133n, 135n. See also first-year composition D’Angelo, Frank, 133n Daiker, Donald A., 78 Dartmouth College, 132n Davis, Barbara, 96 Day, Henry, 41 Denney, Joseph V., 42, 45, 47 development office, 107, 109. See also higher education administration Dewey, John, 16, 53, 105 Dickson, Marcia, 13,

business,” a process that has eroded the faculty’s role in decision-making. In other court decisions the differing interpretations of managerial roles have persisted—for example, chairs of departments at Boston University were found not to be subject to the “managerial exclusion” in a 1978 case, a different conclusion than the one that had been reached in a 1976 case involving the University of Vermont. Malenczyk concludes: “Any time a faculty at a state college or university unionizes, the state

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