Writing Selves, Writing Societies: Research from Activity Perspectives

Writing Selves, Writing Societies: Research from Activity Perspectives

Charles Bazerman

Language: English

Pages: 534

ISBN: 2:00034056

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Writing Selves, Writing Societies: Research from Activity Perspectives

Charles Bazerman

Language: English

Pages: 534

ISBN: 2:00034056

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The chapters in this new edited collection consider human activity and writing from three different perspectives: the role of writing in producing work and the economy; the role of writing in creating, maintaining, and transforming socially located selves and communities; and the role of writing formal education. The editors observe, "The activity approaches to understanding writing presented in this volume give us ways to examine more closely how people do the work of the world and form the relations that give rise to the sense of selves and societies through writing, reading, and circulating texts. These essays provide major contributions to both writing research and activity theory as well as to the recently emerged but now robust research tradition that brings the two together."

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present it as a word jumble (Image 3), so that the instructor would also have to search. In addition, to accompany and contextualize the jumble, she made a list of all the hidden words (Image 4) and why they were there. However, she strategically turned in the jumble first and held back the list until the last minute in the hopes that the instructor would first experience the uncertainty of the word jumble. In every sense, explicitly and implicitly, Neuman’s assignment challenged the premise that

Selves/Writing Societies, Bazerman & Russell http://wac.colostate.edu/books/selves_societies/ Published February 1, 2003 Copyright © 2003 by the Authors & Editors A Central Bank’s “Communications Strategy,” Smart Page 23 In addition to the internal genre set associated with the Bank’s Communications Strategy, one could also identify genres outside the Bank that members of its staff pay close attention to in order to glean relevant information and perspectives from outside groups—for example,

usually get some questions from the staff economists. But we [i.e., staff in the Communications Department] also put on our pretend media hats and try to think of slightly off-center questions that journalists could pose, questions that the economists might not think of. And then when we have the list of questions defined, there will be some questions where we wouldn’t worry about developing an answer; it’s more by way of, “You could get this question coming at you from this angle.” But then

Press. Van Maanen, John. (1988). Tales of the field: On writing ethnography. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Wertsch, James (1997) Mind as action. New York: Oxford UP. Wertsch, James (1991). Voices of the mind: A sociocultural approach to mediated action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Winsor, Dorothy (2001). Learning to do knowledge work in systems of distributed cognition. Journal of Business and Technical Communication 15, 5-28. Yates, JoAnne & Orlikowski, Wanda J. (1992).

be passed to the routines, the makeup of the datatypes, and the specifics of inner workings such as memory usage. These were all data that developers tend to use when they (a) knew the exact name of the routine or datatype to examine, (b) were just learning the inputs of the routines, or (c) needed to know specific information about the inner workings of the code. But library code gave little information about the uses to which the routines and datatypes could be put. And workers at all three

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