Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Volume 1

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Volume 1

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 1602351848

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Volume 1

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 1602351848

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Volumes in WRITING SPACES: READINGS ON WRITING offer multiple perspectives on a wide-range of topics about writing, much like the model made famous by Wendy Bishop's "The Subject Is . . ." series. In each chapter, authors present their unique views, insights, and strategies for writing by addressing the undergraduate reader directly. Drawing on their own experiences, these teachers-as-writers invite students to join in the larger conversation about developing nearly every aspect of craft of writing. Consequently, each essay functions as a standalone text that can easily complement other selected readings in writing or writing-intensive courses across the disciplines at any level. Topics in Volume 1 of the series include academic writing, how to interpret writing assignments, motives for writing, rhetorical analysis, revision, invention, writing centers, argumentation, narrative, reflective writing, Wikipedia, patchwriting, collaboration, and genres. All volumes in the series are published under a Creative Commons license and available for download at the Writing Spaces website (http://www.writingspaces.org), Parlor Press (http://www.parlorpress.com), and the WAC Clearinghouse (http://wac.colostate.edu/). CHARLES LOWE is Assistant Professor of Writing at Grand Valley State University where he teachers composition, professional writing, and Web design. PAVEL ZEMLIANSKY is Associate Professor in the School of Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication at James Madison University.

Writing Mysteries (2nd Edition)

Emancipatory Movements in Composition: The Rhetoric of Possibility

How to Write a Non-fiction Book in 60 Days

Portable MFA in Creative Writing (New York Writers Workshop)

Artful Sentences: Syntax as Style

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

are likely to have higher SAT scores than those with little to no arts involvement. • Develop skills needed by the 21st century workforce: critical thinking, creative problem solving, effective communication, teamwork and more. • Keep students engaged in school and less likely to drop out. (“Arts”) Each bullet above is meant to intellectually persuade parents that they need to be more intentional in providing arts education for their children. Few of us are persuaded only with our mind, though.

experience of your group, you should reflect on what you have learned about the kinds of things that writers should take into account when developing a topic for a specific audience. You should invite other writers to discuss the activity further, focusing on what aspects of topic generation you found most challenging and/or surprising. Student Response to “Refining Topics for Research” As with all group work, classes using this invention activity will experience the occasional hiccup. You might

available to try out may be all you need to begin approaching writing assignments with more effectiveness, clarity and creativity. In his piece entitled “Inventing Invention” from Writing Inventions: Identities, Technologies, Pedagogies, college writing professor Scott Lloyd DeWitt makes a comparison between the inventing space his father used as an engineer and the multitude of invention activities open to writers (17–19). DeWitt describes his father’s garage as a generative place where “wires,

confusing word “analyze.” Your first job when you get a writing assignment is to figure out what the professor expects. This assignment may be explicit in its expectations, but often built into the wording of the most defined writing assignments are implicit expectations that you might not recognize. First, we can say that unless your professor specifically asks you to summarize, you won’t write a summary. Let me say that again: don’t write a summary unless directly asked to. But what, then, does

One” argument above, the author equates the Watergate and Monica Lewinsky scandals. Since it is common knowledge that Watergate was a serious scandal, including Monica Lewinsky in the list offers a strong argument by analogy: the Lewinsky scandal did as much damage as Watergate. To break this rule, you might make an analogy that does not hold up, such as com- 176 Rebecca Jones paring a minor scandal involving a local school board to Watergate. This would be an exaggeration, in most cases. 8.

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