Year's Best SF 9

Year's Best SF 9

Kathryn Cramer

Language: English

Pages: 512

ISBN: 006057559X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Year's Best SF 9

Kathryn Cramer

Language: English

Pages: 512

ISBN: 006057559X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Future Boldly Imagined From Breathtaking New Perspectives

The world as we will know it is far different from the future once predicted in simpler times. For this newest collection of the finest short form SF to appear in print over the preceding year, acclaimed editors and anthologists David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer have gathered remarkable works that reflect a new sensibility. Courageous and diverse stories from some of the finest authors in the field grace this amazing volume -- adventures and discoveries, parables and warnings, carrying those eager to fly to far ends of a vast, ever-shifting universe of alien worlds, strange cultures, and mind-bending technologies. Tomorrow has never been as spellbinding, terrifying, or transforming as it is here, today, in these extraordinary pages. Hang on!

New tales from:
Kage Baker • Gregory Benford • Terry Bisson Rick Moody • Michael Swanwick • John Varley and many more

Gogol's Wife and Other Stories

Blood and Other Cravings

Complete Poems, 1904-1962

Hot Summer Nights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orbital Decay. It was followed by Clarke County, Space (1990) and Lunar Descent (1991), which are also set between Earth and the Moon and belong in the same Future History, which Steele calls the Near Space series. His short fiction is collected in three volumes, Rude Astronauts (1993), All-American Alien Boy (1996), and Sex and Violence in Zero G (1999), which collect the short fiction in the Near Space series and provide a list of the series, “all arranged in chronological order,” he says on

madness, an imaginary person she’d created as a stand-in for everyone she distrusted. Certainly there was no one in the colony who went by that name; she’d already checked the roll to make sure. But Chris apparently accepted him as being real. “A little.” Which wasn’t entirely untruthful. “Enough to know that she hates him.” Chris was quiet for a moment. “He may come into town tonight,” he said. “This time last year, he led a small raiding party up Sand Creek. They broke into the armory in

toward some blank, faceless office cubicle, where I too would be killed. Meanwhile, Ernst Wentworth, like the angelic presence that he was, again had the job of explanation: “Deanna knew about the trip to the water supply, for which we’re embarking now, with many thanks to you for helping us to close the loophole. You were the only person who knew the identity of this informer. Jesse is sticking with you for the last few minutes, because there’s one more thing you have to learn before you’re

pointed at blank air. Then she took Mia’s hand and led her inside. More confusion, more degradation. The single room had an open fire with the simple venting system of a hole in the roof. The bed was high on stilts (why?) with a set of rickety steps made of rotting, untrimmed logs. One corner held a collection of huge pots in which grew greenery; Mia saw three unfired clay pots, one of them sagging sideways so far the soil had spilled onto the packed-dirt floor. Also a beautiful titanium vase

at his feet. “It’s, um, a borderline case, Mia. The decision hasn’t been made yet.” “ ‘Borderline’ how, Lolimel? It’s a virus infecting the brains of humans and degrading their functioning.” He was embarrassed. “Section Six says that, um, some biological conditions, especially persistent ones, create cultural differences for which Corps policy is noninterference. Section Six mentions the religious dietary laws that grew out of inherited food intolerances on—” “I know what Section Six says,

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